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Powering Tomorrow with Concentrated Solar Power! The Sun’s Energy with CSP

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

Exelore is committed to delivering the highest quality products and services to our clients. As part of this commitment, we have partnered with a leading engineering company in the field of thermal solar CSP. By leveraging their expertise and our own capabilities, we are confident that we can provide our clients with the best possible solutions for their needs. Our objective is to offer comprehensive support and expert guidance throughout the entire project life cycle, from development and engineering to construction, operation, and maintenance (O&M).
At Exelore, we understand that each project is unique, which is why we work closely with our clients to design customized solutions that meet their specific needs. We are committed to delivering top-quality services and utilizing the latest technologies and best practices to ensure the success of every project.
Our team of experienced professionals has a proven track record of delivering renewable energy solutions on time and within budget. We take pride in our ability to provide end-to-end project management and exceptional customer service, which has earned us a reputation as a trusted partner in the industry.
One of our core solutions is solar heat integration, which provides a cost-effective way to achieve corporate sustainability goals. By solar heat integration provides a cost-effective way to reduce:
CO2 emissions for corporate sustainability goals
Lower fuel costs by replacing current fuel expenses and eliminating taxes
Ensure energy security for industries through sustainable heat.

How CSP Works

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) is the technology developed to generate electricity by converting concentrated sunlight into solar thermal energy. A parabolic trough is a solar concentrator that uses a parabolic-shaped reflector to focus sunlight onto a tubular-shaped receiver located at its focal point. The reflective surface is distributed in the shape of a parabola, maximizing the amount of sunlight that is directed onto the receiver.
The receiver contains a thermovector fluid so- called heat-transfer fluid (HFT), that flows along the channel at its focal line. This fluid can be water, diathermic oil or molten salts, which are heated by the concentrated sunlight to a high temperature around 400 C.

How CSP Works

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) is the technology developed to generate electricity by converting concentrated sunlight into solar thermal energy. A parabolic trough is a solar concentrator that uses a parabolic-shaped reflector to focus sunlight onto a tubular-shaped receiver located at its focal point. The reflective surface is distributed in the shape of a parabola, maximizing the amount of sunlight that is directed onto the receiver.
The receiver contains a thermovector fluid so- called heat-transfer fluid (HFT), that flows along the channel at its focal line. This fluid can be water, diathermic oil or molten salts, which are heated by the concentrated sunlight to a high temperature around 400 C.
Parabolic troughs are the most common and commercially available type of solar concentrator. They are typically aligned on a north-south axis and are capable of rotating to follow the sun’s path as it moves from east to west throughout the day.
The heat retained in the fluid is stored and then powers a turbine to generate electrical energy. As we are talking about a thermal energy storage (TES), this energy can be used later, during periods of low sunlight, and even at night.

Solar Heat For Power Generation

By optimizing the heat transfer processes and reducing thermal losses, CSP systems can generate more electricity per unit of solar energy, making them a more cost-effective and competitive option for power generation. One major advantage of CSP is its ability to store excess thermal energy, enabling continuous electricity generation even when the sun is not shining.
The Solana Generating Station is a solar power plant near Gila Bend, Arizona, about 70 miles (110 km) southwest of Phoenix. When commissioned, it was the largest parabolic trough plant in the world, and the first U.S. solar plant with molten salt thermal energy storage. The power plant can produce up to 280 megawatts (MW) gross, supplied by two 140 MW gross (125 MW net) steam turbine generators, enough electricity to meet the needs of approximately 70,000 homes and obviate the emission of roughly 475,000 tons of CO2 every year. [Its name is the Spanish “Solana” term for “sunny spot”.]

Hybrid CSP/PV Systems Offer a Promising Future for Renewable Energy

Concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV) are two of the most promising renewable energy technologies for generating electricity. Hybrid CSP/PV systems offer a number of advantages over standalone PV or CSP systems. By combining the strengths of both technologies, hybrid systems can provide a more reliable and affordable source of renewable energy. One of the main advantages of hybrid CSP/PV systems is their ability to provide continuous electricity generation, even at night or on cloudy days. This is because CSP systems can store thermal energy during the day and use it to generate electricity at night or when the sun is not shining. One of the most exciting aspects of hybrid CSP/PV systems is their potential to provide continuous 24-hour electricity with relatively low costs.
It is notable that a hybrid CSP/PV system with 13 hours of Thermal energy storage (TES) would be able to replicate the flexibility of gas-fired power plants, but with a lower LCOE (levelized cost of energy). Another advantage of hybrid CSP/PV systems is their high efficiency. PV systems are more efficient at converting sunlight into electricity during the day, while CSP systems are more cost-effective at converting thermal energy into electricity. By combining the two technologies, hybrid systems can achieve an overall efficiency that is higher than either PV or CSP systems alone. As the cost of hybrid systems continues to decline, they are becoming a more realistic and affordable alternative to traditional fossil fuel-fired power plants.

Hybrid CSP/PV systems benefits:

It can be used to power remote communities that are not connected to the grid.
It can be used to provide baseload power for electric grids.
It can be used to provide peak power for electric grids.
It can be used to desalinate water and produce hydrogen.
Hybrid systems can be more efficient than standalone systems, and they can also help to reduce grid reliance, which can save money on transmission and distribution costs. As the world transitions to a clean energy future, hybrid CSP/PV systems are likely to play a major role in providing reliable and affordable renewable energy.

Desalination: Turning Saltwater into Freshwater

Access to clean and potable water is a fundamental human right, yet water scarcity remains a pressing issue in many regions worldwide. Exelore’s innovative approach combines CSP technology with desalination processes to transform abundant seawater into freshwater. The thermal energy is used to heat seawater, converting it into steam. This steam can be directed through a series of multi-effect distillation (MED), multi-stage flash (MSF) or and reverse osmoses (RO) desalination units. In these units, the steam condenses into freshwater, leaving behind concentrated brine. By using the sun’s energy to heat and evaporate seawater, we can produce clean drinking water on a large scale, mitigating the effects of drought and ensuring a sustainable water supply for communities in need.

Advantages of Thermosolar CSP for Desalination:

Environmentally Friendly: With no reliance on fossil fuels and minimal carbon emissions, thermosolar CSP for desalination is an eco-friendly choice.
Cost-Efficient: The abundant sunlight in many arid regions makes this technology economically viable in the long run, reducing energy costs for desalination.
Water Independence: It offers regions with limited freshwater resources the opportunity to become more self-sufficient and resilient in the face of water scarcity.
Scalability: CSP plants can be scaled up or down to meet the specific needs of communities, making it a versatile solution.

Solar Heat For Industrial Processes

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technology can be a dependable, user-friendly, high-quality, and cost-effective resource to meet the heat requirements of various industrial sectors, including chemical, metal, wood, plastic, and textile industries. However, achieving this goal requires the development of user-friendly heating and cooling systems that combine readily available solar technologies with advanced thermal components, all at an affordable cost. With the right mix of technology and innovation, CSP solar heat can become a reliable source of renewable energy for industries, providing a sustainable solution for meeting their energy needs.
KEAN Soft Drinks Parabolic Trough – Limassol, Cyprus – Manufacture of beverages = Year of operation : 2018
Food and beverage sector is the highest consumer of fossil fuels paying an annual average cost 20.2 million euros in fuel.
The first pilot PTC system can produce 125 kWth which can be utilized at 180 oC and 10 bars.
This type of system can exploit the solar abundance of Cyprus and covers the thermal demands all over the year.
Installing this type of system in a dairy factory with thermal needs of 190 kWth is proved feasible. The production can follow the demand with a solar contribution of 68 %. The investment will have a payback period of 5 y, solar savings of €161,702 and 394,102 kgCO2 savings.

More than half of the heat demand of industrial processes is below 300°C, which is a temperature range that a concentrated solar system can perfectly provide.

The industrial sector uses heat for many applications, including washing, cooking, sterilizing, drying, preheating boiler feed water, viscosity control, and many other processes.

Some specific industries that require heat in one form or another are:

Gas Processing Industry

Heaters maintain the correct viscosity of petrochemical liquids and gasses when processing in extreme temperature conditions. Direct heating using immersion heaters delivers faster and more consistent heat dispersal inside tanks.

Chemical and Petrochemical Industries

Heaters are essential for distilling petroleum into its components. They use heat to combine chemicals into new ones or break them down into basic elements.

Power Generation

Heat drives the electrical generators that power our world. While the fuel or heat source can be different, the result is a steady supply of electrical power.

Aerospace

Composites are a core construction material for aircraft bodies, wings, and parts for satellites. Typical curing temperatures range between 250 °F and 350 °F (121 °C and 171 °C) inside autoclaves and curing ovens.

Food & Beverage

From brewing and distilling to canning and baking production lines, process heat is vital to all commercial F&B processes.

Amazing Strategy

Operates an atmosphere that promote creative approach for clients needs.

Agriculture

The types of heating found in agriculture include plant utility heating, tank and suction heating for ammonia tanks, and other chemicals, to name a few.

General Manufacturing

Almost any manufacturing sector requires heat at some point. Examples include molds and presses for plastic products, calendar rolls for drying textiles and papers, dryers, kilns, and air heating for turbines.

Market Segments

Source: IEA TASK 49
Solar collectors are capable of supplying heat at varying temperatures, making them a valuable resource for a range of industries. The chart below outlines the most suitable collector types for various market segments, providing insight into the diverse applications of solar thermal technology.
Sources: IRENA / IEA

Heat Demand

The global demand for low and medium temperature heat applications is substantial, amounting to approximately 44 exajoules or 12,222 terawatt-hours. This demand is spread across various industries, as illustrated in the chart.
Source: ship-plants.info
The global demand for low and medium temperature heat applications is substantial, amounting to approximately 44 exajoules or 12,222 terawatt-hours. This demand is spread across various industries, as illustrated in the chart.